NY Times Reporter Julie Bosman Has Not Reported Since Darren Wilson Address Controversy

It has been nearly a month since New York Times reporter Julie Bosman has had an article published with her byline.

julie bosman

Bosman was the target of an online lynch mob upset that she and fellow Times reporter, Campbell Robertson, in an article published November 24, A Quiet Wedding for Darren Wilson, included the name of the town and street that now former Ferguson, Missouri police officer Darren Wilson lived at before he fled the home after being threatened over the shooting death of Black robber Michael Brown.

The home addresses of Bosman and Robertson were posted online in retaliation. Bosman reportedly sought police protection after being harassed.

Wilson’s address had been widely reported by some in the mainstream media in the days after the August 9th incident between the white officer and young Black criminal. CNN showed video of Wilson’s house and street number while other outlets reported the town and street name.

A report by The Gateway Pundit calling out the media for drawing a map to Wilson’s home was featured on the Drudge Report three days in a row last August.

The timing of the Times’ November report as the grand jury cleared Wilson prompted the backlash against the reporters.

A search of the Times shows the last mention of Bosman on a byline was November 25th for an article entitled Amid Conflicting Accounts, Trusting Darren Wilson. Bosman shared the byline with Robertson and two others. Bosman was also credited with contributing to a few other Ferguson articles that day.

Unlike Bosman, Robertson has returned to reporting after a hiatus following the offending article with a report on Dec. 12 about the death of Sen. Thad Cochran’s wife, Rose Cochran, a Figure in a Campaign Attack Video, Dies at 73

But both Bosman and Robertson have gone dark on Twitter.

Bosman’s last tweet was the evening of November 25th to Charles C. Johnson.

Robertson’s last tweets and retweets were on the evening of November 24th.

The Times’ David Carr wrote on Monday that Bosman and Robertson fled their homes in fear after Johnson published their addresses:

“The reporters and their families were forced to vacate their homes after facing threats of robbery and rape.”

Early in December a man named Jaleel Tarik Abdul-Jabbaar was arrested for threatening to kill Wilson. In the charging documents was a news article he reposted online that featured Wilson’s address:

“Other messages and posts included “I would love to smoke a white motha [expletive] cop,” as well as “We the oppressed people need to kill this white cop” along with a repost of a news story containing Wilson’s address.

“On Nov. 11, Abdul-Jabbaar allegedly wrote “Are there any REAL BLACK MEN that would love to go down to Ferguson Missouri to give back those bullets to Police Officer [D.W.] fired into the body of Mike Brown. If we’re unable to locate Officer [D.W.], then We’ll return them to his wife and if not her then his children.”

“Two days before the Grand Jury’s decision whether or not to indict Wilson was announced, Abdul-Jabbaar allegedly wrote “I got my money to go to Ferguson… Who else is going to put in some work?”

“When the Grand Jury decision was announced on Nov. 24, Abdul-Jabbaar allegedly re-posted a news report containing Wilson’s name and photograph with the message “Ready to go and kill some cops.””

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