Liberal Org Invests Millions to Create Master Blacklist – Will Starve Conservative Sites from Advertising

Liberal fascism is alive and well in America.

Whether the left is beating heads on the street or smearing opposing viewpoints the goal is the same – to eliminate the opposition.

Democrats can’t win in the marketplace of ideas.
So they will shut down opposing voices instead.


Democrat protesters shut down free speech at Berkeley campus

Recently the Open Brand Safety framework was created to develop a master list of opposition websites so advertisers can blackmail them and starve them out of business.

This is the latest attempt by the left to hold on to their information monopoly.

Since the election Democrats have created lists to shut down such popular websites as Breitbart and The Gateway Pundit.

Now they have another $14 million to add to their war chest.

No opposing viewpoints will be allowed in America.
Nieman Lab reported:

The Open Brand Safety framework is an attempt to create a master list of fake news sites so advertisers can learn to avoid them.

For the last few weeks, it’s looked like fake news has spawned its own opposition industry. Money to fight the now-apparent-to-all evil has poured out of foundation coffers faster than Sean Spicer clarifications.

In February, Craig Newmark made his big individual pledge to supporting trust in news, committing $6 million. Then we heard that five funders will create the News Integrity Initiative with $14 million, with Facebook itself participating. Then, just a day later, entrepreneur/journalism funder Pierre Omidyar publicly committed a cool $100 million to “to support investigative journalism, fight misinformation and counteract hate speech around the world.” (First up for that fund are a $4.5 million grant to International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, the Washington-based group behind last year’s Panama Papers investigation, and money for the Anti-Defamation League to fight hate speech.)

Just after the Omidyar largesse was hitting the press, I visited with digital pundit and CUNY professor Jeff Jarvis in his office, just a block away from The New York Times. CUNY had just been named the administrator of the $14 million, with lead money provided by Facebook, the Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund, John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the Tow Foundation, and the Democracy Fund. All totaled, 19 organizations had signed on to the initiative, including advertising exchange AppNexus and PR companies Edelman and Weber Shandwick.

I wanted to know how Jarvis and CUNY would fight the scourge that had become the media’s bête noire, even as the term “fake news” had spiraled out of all sense, the epithet of choice for anyone, including the White House’s current occupant, who may disagree with a news company’s reports.

I entered the conversation skeptically. I’ve believed, conservatively, that actually providing money to pay more experienced journalists to do journalism — as some of Omidyar’s and other funding has stepped up to do — may be the best tonic for what ails fact-challenged America in 2017. After all, it’s been The New York Times’ and The Washington Post’s reporting, mildly beefed up and abetted by the surge of digital subscriptions, that has ended several careers at Fox News and helped bring down the prevaricating Michael Flynn.

Read the rest here.

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