Antifa Terrorists Launch Chapters with Faculty Members on US Campuses


Antifa in action at the Trump inauguration (Andrew Marcus)

FOR OVER A YEAR conservative Americans and Trump supporters have been assaulted, spit on, beaten, cold-cocked, egged, chased, tackled and bloodied  for attending Trump rallies and conservative events.

THE VIOLENCE AGAINST CONSERVATIVES HAS ESCALATED–

Just last month members of a Patriot Prayer group canceled their rally but a few supporters turned out anyway.
That’s when hundreds of alt-left Antifa protesters rioted.

An army of violent left-wing Antifa terrorists wearing all black, covering their faces with masks terrorized Trump supporters and chased them while trying to steal their phones and cameras. Police did not step in to stop the violence.

Antifa screamed ‘Take his camera, take his phone!’

An army of Antifa shouting ‘BLOCK UP!’

After years of far left Antifa violence, hundreds of bloodied bodies and tens of thousands of dollars of property damage the FBI and DHS have listed Antifa violence as “domestic terrorist violence.”

Now this…
Antifa terrorists are organizing campus chapters with faculty members.
Chronicle.com reported:

Rallies for far-right speakers, misrepresentation of professors’ statements, and racist or Islamophobic signs are popping up on campuses across the country. Some faculty members think that trend is more than just a conservative backlash against perceived liberal bias; it’s fascism.
In an effort to push back, Bill Mullen, an English professor at Purdue University, last spring formed a coalition of scholars called the Campus Anti-Fascist Network. Since a white-supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., that started on the University of Virginia’s campus turned deadly in August, Mr. Mullen said the network had grown from 40 to 400 members. including faculty, staff, and students.

“This is a very, very bad turn in higher education,” Mr. Mullen said. “We invite people from diverse political perspectives to join this network as long as they oppose fascism.”

He and David Palumbo-Liu, a comparative-literature professor at Stanford University, formed the network after seeing academics such as Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, an assistant professor of African-American studies at Princeton University, and Johnny E. Williams, a sociology professor at Trinity College, in Connecticut, face death threats in response to comments that some found controversial.

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