MO Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder Files Legal Challenge to ObamaTax Ballot Language

Missouri Lt. Governor Peter Kinder is filing a lawsuit challenging biased ObamaTax language that will appear on Missouri’s November 7 ballot.
Last week Kinder told radio host Mark Reardon that the Missouri lawsuit against Obamacare is still on.

The Kansas City Star reported:

Republican Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder is once again taking his opposition to federal health care law to court, this time with a lawsuit challenging language that will appear on Missouri’s Nov. 7 ballot.

The ballot language –which was crafted by Democratic Secretary of State Robin Carnahan – attempts to summarize a measure passed by the Republican-dominated General Assembly that will allow voters to decide whether the governor should be allowed to set up an online marketplace for patients to shop for insurance policies. These so-called “health care exchanges” are a key provision of President Barack Obama’s health reform law.

The ballot language asks voters, “Shall Missouri law be amended to deny individuals, families, and small businesses the ability to access affordable health care plans through a state-based health benefit exchange unless authorized by statute, initiative or referendum or through an exchange operated by the federal government as required by the federal health care act?”

The language was immediately greeted with outrage from Missouri Republicans. Kinder, who sued the federal government in 2010 claiming the health care reform law was unconstitutional, called Carnahan’s ballot language “extremely biased.”

Thursday afternoon, he announced he was filing a lawsuit challenging the language either Friday or early next week. He is reaching out to legislators to allow them to join his lawsuit.

“In my 19 years in public office, I have seen no ballot language proposed by a secretary of state that even approaches this in its outrageousness,” Kinder said, later adding: “She words it as though the Obama White House had written the language. There is nothing fair or accurate about that ballot summary.”

Kinder said he would attempt to raise private funds to pay for the legal challenge, a tactic he employed in 2010 when he created a nonprofit to pay for his federal lawsuit. Almost all the funding for his federal lawsuit came from Revere America — a Washington, D.C.,-based group that is dedicated to repealing the health care law.

Comments

As a privately owned web site, we reserve the right to edit or remove comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence, racism, anti-Semitism, or personal/abusive attacks on other users. The same applies to trolling, the use of multiple aliases, or just generally being a jerk. Enforcement of this policy is at the sole discretion of the site administrators and repeat offenders may be blocked or permanently banned without warning